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American Journal of Food Technology
  Year: 2014 | Volume: 9 | Issue: 6 | Page No.: 302-310
DOI: 10.3923/ajft.2014.302.310
Fish Processing Technologies in Nigeria: A Case Study of Ibeju-Lekki Local Government Area, Lagos State
F.O.A. George, A.O. Ogbolu, O.J. Olaoye, S.O. Obasa, A.A. Idowu and D.O. Odulate

Abstract:
Traditional fish processing technologies vary widely in terms of equipment type, size and processing efficiency in Nigeria’s coastal states. This study was carried out to identify fish processing technologies and evaluate the effectiveness, energy sources and efficiency of fish smoking equipment used in the study area. Data was collected using structured questionnaire administered between January and March, 2011 in seven fishing villages along the coastline in the Ibeju-Lekki LGA, Nigeria. Major fish species being processed were identified and the profitability of the post harvest technologies adopted was evaluated. A total of five traditional fish processing equipment were observed and included galvanized iron sheet supported by planks 51 (46.4%), drum oven 8 (7.2%), black clay oven 24 (21.8%), red clay oven 9 (8.1%), brick kiln 5 (4.2%) and government model kiln 4 (3.5%). Generally, energy sources were fuel wood and charcoal for traditional fish processing equipment and electricity for the government model kiln. Majority of traditional fish processors were peasant women and three types of processing technologies were observed, including air drying (1.0%), hot smoking (69.1%) and salting and smoking (29.9%). The capacity of kilns and ovens observed ranged from 20-50 kg day-1 with a price range of 10, 000- 50, 000. Factors considered before replacement of smoking equipment by the processors were equipment ruggedness, cost and production capacity. Women’s involvement in traditional fish processing was 95% and major fish species in the value chain included Ethmalosa fimbriata, Caranx senegallus, Sardinella maderensis, Drepane africana, Cynoglossus monodis, Pseudotolithus senegalensis, P. typus, Arius latiscutatus and A. mercatoris. It was observed that products of traditional fish processing industry were readily acceptable to consumers and commanded marginal market prices with optimal economic benefits to processors.
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How to cite this article:

F.O.A. George, A.O. Ogbolu, O.J. Olaoye, S.O. Obasa, A.A. Idowu and D.O. Odulate, 2014. Fish Processing Technologies in Nigeria: A Case Study of Ibeju-Lekki Local Government Area, Lagos State. American Journal of Food Technology, 9: 302-310.

DOI: 10.3923/ajft.2014.302.310

URL: http://scialert.net/abstract/?doi=ajft.2014.302.310

 
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