Asian Science Citation Index is committed to provide an authoritative, trusted and significant information by the coverage of the most important and influential journals to meet the needs of the global scientific community.  
ASCI Database
308-Lasani Town,
Sargodha Road,
Faisalabad, Pakistan
Fax: +92-41-8815544
Contact Via Web
Suggest a Journal
 
Articles by J. M. Dekker
Total Records ( 4 ) for J. M. Dekker
  M. C. Adriaanse , J. M. Dekker , R. J. Heine , F. J. Snoek , A. J. Beekman , C. D. Stehouwer , L. M. Bouter , G. Nijpels and F. Pouwer
  Objective  To study the prevalence and risk factors of depressive symptoms, comparing subjects with normal glucose metabolism (NGM), impaired glucose metabolism (IGM) or Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2).

Research design and methods  Cross-sectional data from a population-based cohort study conducted among 550 residents (276 men and 274 women) of the Hoorn region, the Netherlands. Levels of depressive symptoms were measured using the Centre for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D score ≥ 16). Glucose metabolism status was determined by means of fasting and post-load glucose levels.

Results  The prevalence of depressive symptoms in men with NGM, IGM and DM2 was 7.7, 7.0 and 15.0% (P = 0.19) and for women 7.7, 23.1 and 19.7% (P < 0.01), respectively. Depression was significantly more common in women with IGM [odds ratio (OR) = 3.60, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.57 to 8.28] and women with DM2 (OR = 3.18, 95% CI = 1.31 to 7.74). In men, depression was not associated with IGM (OR = 0.90, 95% CI = 0.32 to 2.57) and non-significantly more common in DM2 (OR = 2.04, 95% CI = 0.75 to 5.49). Adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors, cardiovascular disease and diabetes symptoms reduced the strength of these associations.

Conclusions  Depressive symptoms are more common in women with IGM, but not men. Adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors, cardiovascular disease and diabetes symptoms partially attenuated these associations, suggesting that these variables could be intermediate factors.

  U. L. Malanda , S. D. Bot , D. P. French , P. J. Kostense , A. N. Wade , J. M. Dekker , G. Nijpels and A. J. Farmer
  Aim  Hypoglycaemia may have a detrimental impact on quality of life for patients with Type 2 diabetes. There are few clinical studies exploring the impact of experiencing hypoglycaemia on beliefs about diabetes and health status. The aim of this study was to explore associations between experience of hypoglycaemia and changes in diabetes beliefs and self-reported health status in patients with non-insulin-treated Type 2 diabetes using a blood glucose meter.

Methods  One-year prospective cohort analysis of 226 patients recruited to a randomized trial evaluating the impact of self-monitoring of blood glucose. Self-reported hypoglycaemia over 1 year was categorized into three groups: (1) no experience of hypoglycaemia; (2) blood glucose measurements < 4 mmol/l with no associated symptoms of hypoglycaemia (grade 1); and (3) symptomatic hypoglycaemia (grade 2 and 3). Measures of beliefs about diabetes (Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire) and health status (EuroQol-5D) were assessed at baseline and 1 year. Differences in mean changes over 1 year were explored with analyses of covariance.

Results  There was a significant increase in mean score in beliefs about personal control (1.14; 95% CI 0.14-2.14) among those experiencing grade 1 hypoglycaemia compared with those not experiencing hypoglycaemia. There were no significant differences in changes in health status between groups, with small overall changes that were inconsistent between groups.

Conclusions  This study does not provide support for a long-term adverse impact on beliefs about diabetes or health status from the experience of mild symptomatic hypoglycaemia, in well-controlled, non-insulin-treated patients with Type 2 diabetes using self-monitoring of blood glucose.

  R. van der Pols-Vijlbrief , J. M. Dekker , C. D. Stehouwer , M. R. de Boer , G. Nijpels , F. J. Snoek and M. C. Adriaanse
 

Aims

To study symptom burden among older people and its associations with change in glucose metabolism status over a 7-year period.

Methods

We conducted a prospective population-based cohort study among 397 older people. We used the revised Diabetes Symptom Checklist to assess symptom burden. Glucose metabolism status was determined using an oral glucose tolerance test. Analyses were adjusted for multiple confounders, including cardiovascular risk and risk of depression (Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale score ≥ 16).

Results

Revised Diabetes Symptom Checklist total scores (range 0-100) increased slightly over time among people with normal glucose metabolism (mean difference β1.04; P = 0.04) and those with impaired glucose metabolism (β1.96; P = 0.01), but not among people with Type 2 diabetes (β0.46; P = 0.55). These associations between symptom burden and glucose status were attenuated after full adjustment for multiple confounders and remained statistically significant for those with impaired glucose status. Linear mixed models showed significant mean differences in revised Diabetes Symptom Checklist total scores over time when comparing people with Type 2 diabetes with those with normal or impaired glucose metabolism, but not when comparing subjects with impaired vs normal glucose metabolism; these results did not alter after full adjustment.

Conclusions

Symptom burden increased gradually over time in the people with impaired glucose metabolism and those with normal glucose metabolism, but not in patients with Type 2 diabetes over a 7-year follow-up period.

  B. Guigas , J. E. de Leeuw van Weenen , N. van Leeuwen , A. M. Simonis-Bik , T. W. van Haeften , G. Nijpels , J. J. Houwing-Duistermaat , M. Beekman , J. Deelen , L. M. Havekes , B. W. J. H. Penninx , N. Vogelzangs , E. van t Riet , A. Dehghan , A. Hofman , J. C. Witteman , A. G. Uitterlinden , N. Grarup , T. Jorgensen , D. R. Witte , T. Lauritzen , T. Hansen , O. Pedersen , J. Hottenga , J. A. Romijn , M. Diamant , M. H. H. Kramer , R. J. Heine , G. Willemsen , J. M. Dekker , E. M. Eekhoff , H. Pijl , E. J. de Geus , P. E. Slagboom and L. M. t Hart
 

Aims

Modulation of dopamine receptor D2 (DRD2) activity affects insulin secretion in both rodents and isolated pancreatic β-cells. We hypothesized that single nucleotide polymorphisms in the DRD2/ANKK1 locus may affect susceptibility to Type 2 diabetes in humans.

Methods

Four potentially functional variants in the coding region of the DRD2/ANKK1 locus (rs1079597, rs6275, rs6277, rs1800497) were genotyped and analysed for Type 2 diabetes susceptibility in up to 25 000 people (8148 with Type 2 diabetes and 17687 control subjects) from two large independent Dutch cohorts and one Danish cohort. In addition, 340 Dutch subjects underwent a 2-h hyperglycaemic clamp to investigate insulin secretion. Since sexual dimorphic associations related to DRD2 polymorphisms have been previously reported, we also performed a gender-stratified analysis.

Results

rs1800497 at the DRD2/ANKK1 locus was associated with a significantly increased risk for Type 2 diabetes in women (odds ratio 1.14 (1.06-1.23); = 4.1*10−4) but not in men (odds ratio 1.00 (95% CI 0.93-1.07); = 0.92) or the combined group. Although rs1800497 was not associated with insulin secretion, we did find another single nucleotide polymorphism in this locus, rs6275, to be associated with increased first-phase glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in women (= 5.5*10−4) but again not in men (= 0.34).

Conclusion

The present data identify DRD2/ANKK1 as a potential sex-specific Type 2 diabetes susceptibility gene.

 
 
 
Copyright   |   Desclaimer   |    Privacy Policy   |   Browsers   |   Accessibility