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Articles by R. Son
Total Records ( 3 ) for R. Son
  R. Suzita , A.S. Abdulamir , Fatimah Abu Bakar and R. Son
  Problem statement: Food borne illness occurs all over the world. Vibrio cholerae is the etiological agent of cholera which is spread by contaminated food, water or direct fecal contact with food handlers. There are also examples of sporadic outbreaks of illness attributed to raw products eaten unprocessed. Consequently, there was a widespread concern that food in international trade carries pathogenic microorganisms that could result in outbreaks of illness. Approach: A review was done on the role of shellfish and seafood in the transmission of cholera. Google, Pubmed and Scpus were used in preparation of this review. Results: This review clarified that shellfish is one of the main seafood sources for the transmission of cholera. In natural waters Vibrio cholerae can be presented in both free-living state or attached to copepods, zooplankter and algae. Vibrio cholerae can adhere strongly to the shellfish digestive tract and cannot be effectively removed by rinsing the shellfish or by depuration. Colonization or attachment of Vibrio cholerae to shellfish increased the resistance of these bacteria to heat, drying and low pH. Conclusion: Therefore, sea food in general and shellfish in particular provided suitable background for cholera outbreaks. Unfortunately, this mode of transmission was underestimated. Accordingly, proper cooking, storing and re-heating of foods before eating were considered as main safety measures for preventing food-borne transmission of cholera. It was recommended to reconsider this mode of transmission for cholera again as source of cholera epidemics.
  W.M. Wan Norhasima , A.S. Abdulamir , F. Abu Bakar , R. Son and A. Norhafniza
  Problem statements: Fumonisin was a mycotoxin produced mainly by fungi belonging to the genus Fusarium in various foods and feeds. They occurred worldwide and were found predominantly in corn and in corn-based animal feeds and also can be found in other crops. Contamination of food and feed with fumonisins has been implicated in and associated with a number of diseases in both livestock as well as human beings. Approach: A review was done on the effect of fumonisins on animal and human and detoxification method for the prevention. ScienceDirect, Scopus, PubMed, Google and Yahoo were used in the preparation of this review. Results: This review clarified that the major forms of fumonisins found in food were the B series, fumonisin B1, B2 and B3. Fumonisin B1 (FB1) was the most common and the most thoroughly studied. FB1 caused toxicities in animals including Equine Leukoencephalomalacia (ELEM), Porcine Pulmonary Edema (PPE) in pigs and nephrotoxic, hepatotoxic and hepatocarcinogenic in rats. Furthermore, FB1 had been implicated to be associated with high rates of human esophageal cancer. In addition to their natural occurrence in corn-based animal feeds and in home-grown corn used for food, fumonisins were frequently found in commercial corn-based foods. Methods for prevention and detoxification for fumonisins included prevention of plants contamination at the field level and harvest and post-harvest control of fumonisins. Furthermore, the diseases occurred in livestock will pose the additional economic losses in livestock farmers. Conclusion: Due to economic losses engendered by fumonisin, several strategies for detoxifying and preventing contaminated foods and feeds had been described in the literature including physical and biological process. However these methods still in demonstrated. Awareness of fumonisin-related animal diseases, contamination of fumonisin in foods and feeds and adherence to guidance recommendation in prevention methods were important for reducing fumonisin-induced diseases in agriculturally important species.
  M. Raftari , F. Azizi Jalilian , A.S. Abdulamir , R. Son , Z. Sekawy and A.B. Fatimah
  Researchers in the area of microbiological meat safety, in an attempt to reduce beef carcass contamination, try carcass-washing treatments as an effective method to control pathogenic bacteria. Spray wash treatments utilizing 3 concentrations (1, 1.5 and 2%) of acetic, lactic, propionic and formic acids were performed to evaluate their efficacy in reducing numbers of Escherichia coli O157: H7 on meat tissues at 4±1°C. The meat was decontaminated with hot water and then inoculated with E. coli O157: H7, which then was spray washed with organic acids for 15 sec separately. The population of E. coli O157: H7 significantly (p<0.05) reduced after being spray washed with all treatments. The lethality effect of all organic acids according to the concentration was 2% concentration >1.5% concentration >1% concentration. Mean log reductions of E. coli O157: H7showed that the antibacterial effect of formic acid >lactic acid >acetic acid >propionic acid. The results of this study also indicated that formic acid is a good antibacterial agent for decontaminating animals carcass surfaces.
 
 
 
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