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Articles by S.K. Darkey
Total Records ( 5 ) for S.K. Darkey
  B.M. Dzomeku , F. Armo-Annor , K. Adjei-Gyan and S.K. Darkey
  An agronomic study was conducted to evaluate three Musa hybrids (BITA-3, a cooking banana, FHIA-21 and CRBP-39 both hybrid plantains) with 500 farmers in the two Assin districts in the Central region of Ghana. At harvest sensory evaluation was carried out on the three hybrids to access their acceptability at four locations in the two districts. The study was conducted to assess the consumer acceptability of the hybrids for use as fufu, ampesi and fried ripe plantain. A total of 360 untrained taste panelists from four communities (Assin Foso, Adiembra, Bremang and Amoanin) all in the two Assin districts of the Central region of Ghana comprising both males and females were used in the study. At each location, panelists were presented with two coded samples (A and B) of fufu, ampesi and fried plantain comprising of Apantu (for fufu and fried plantain), Apem (for ampesi) and Musa hybrids (FHIA-21, BITA-3 and CRBP-39). Assessors were asked to compare the two coded samples on the bases of texture, taste, colour and overall acceptability, using the hedonic descriptive scale of 1-5. The results indicated that there were no significant differences (p<0.01) between FHIA-21 and CRBP-39 and the local Apantu across the location, across the parameters and the recipes assessed. FHIA-21 and CRBP-39 were the most preferred and compared favourably with the local triploids (Apantu and Apem) with BITA-3 the least preferred. The hybrids were accepted for ripe fried at stages 3 and 4 of ripening. Beyond these stages of ripening, the hybrids could only be used for other processed food recipes. Some panelists who claimed to be diabetic indicated their preference for the hybrids especially BITA-3 as their glucose level was normal after eating meals made from the hybrids. The results showed that the food habits of the people are important in the introduction of new hybrids.
  B.M. Dzomeku , R.K. Bam , E. Adu-Kwarteng , S.K. Darkey and A.A. Ankomah
  The agronomic evaluation of FHIA-21 was conducted at three locations in the semi-deciduous forest region of Ghana. The physio-chemical composition of the green stages of the fruits was also determined. Pulp and peel colours were measured with a Chromatometer (Minolta). Results indicated that the hybrid was very tolerant to the black Sigatoka disease with high number of functional leaves at flowering and at harvest. The crop cycle was comparable to the False Horn plantains. The yield performance of the hybrid was high ranging from 34 and 38 t ha-1 across the locations. The yield values have been stable over the three-year study period. In addition, the FHIA hybrid plants were relatively short. The physio-chemical composition results showed that the hybrid had high fat (1.94%) and water (60%) contents. The potassium content was also high (1060 mg/100 g dry weight) however the iron content (0.45%/100 g dry weight) was low. The high potassium level in the hybrid may be an advantage for use as a therapy. FHIA-21 had bright orange pulp colour which was indicative of the presence of provitamins and carotenoids.
  B.M. Dzomeku , M.D. Quain , J.N.L. Lamptey , F.O Anno-Nyako , A. Aubyn and S.K. Darkey
  The agronomic evaluation of some IITA hybrids (BITA-3, PITA-1, PITA-4, and BITA-2) was conducted alongside some local land races and FHIA-21 at two locations in the semi-deciduous forest region of Ghana. Some farmers also evaluated the hybrids for their agronomic performance and the sensory qualities. A survey was conducted to sample the views of farmers on the hybrids. Results indicated that the hybrids were very tolerant to the black Sigatoka disease with high number of functional leaves at flowering and at harvest. The crop cycle was comparable to the False Horn plantains. BITA-3 however was early maturing (12 months) compared to 15 to 18 months crop cycles. Majority of farmers (94%) declared that the hybrids were superior to the landraces in terms of agronomic characters. They added that the hybrids remained green throughout with about 10 green leaves at harvest as against 0 to 4 for the landraces. This characteristic of the hybrids was an important feature because it provided shade for their young cocoa plants. 63.9% of respondents ranked FHIA 21 as the best in terms of yield, taste and commercial potential. BITA-3 was rated second but to be used for processing. 65% of the farmers declared that PITA hybrids were tasty and good for fufu. BITA-2 was outright rejected for its finger size and length though it was very roubust and disease-free. Some women indicated that the hybrids cooked faster and so required less time for cooking and also saved them fuel wood.
  B.M. Dzomeku , F. Armo-Annor , K. Adjei -Gyan , J. Ansah , A. Nkakwa and S.K. Darkey
  An agronomic study was conducted to evaluate three Musa hybrids (BITA-3 - cooking banana, FHIA-21 and CRBP-39- both hybrid plantains) with five hundred farmers in the two Assin districts in the Central region of Ghana. At harvest sensory evaluation was carried out on the three hybrids for use as fufu, ampesi and ripe fried plantain to access their acceptability at four locations in the two districts. The results showed that there was no significant difference (p<0.05) between the numbers of leaves at flowering among the hybrids across the locations. The hybrids showed superiority over the local check in terms of number of functional leaves from flowering to harvest. All the hybrids (FHIA-21, CRBP 39, BITA-3 and FHIA-25) exhibited stable performance in yield and growth characteristics across the locations. FHIA-25 was however late maturing (18-20 months) whereas BITA-3 was early maturing (10-12 months). Nevertheless, the bunch weight (40-50 kg) of FHIA-25 could be said to have compensated for the long crop cycle. Daughter sucker production by FHIA-25 was also low (two daughter suckers at flowering). BITA-3 was roboust and sturdy with pseudostem girth of 60 cm carrying an average bunch weight of 25 kg. All the hybrids were resistant to the black Sigatoka disease. These results suggested that the performance of the hybrids was not influenced by the seasons or locations. It implies that under good management practices, farmers would be assured of good yields irrespective of time or season of planting so long as there is adequate supply of moisture. The results of the sensory evaluation indicated that there were no significant differences (p<0.01) between FHIA-21 and CRBP-39 and the local Apantu across the location, across the parameters and the recipes assessed. FHIA-21 and CRBP-39 were the most preferred and compared favourably with the local triploids (Apantu and Apem) with BITA-3 the least preferred. The hybrids were accepted for ripe fried plantain at stages 3 and 4 of ripening. Beyond these stages of ripening, the hybrids could only be used for other processed food recipes.
  B.M. Dzomeku , S.K. Darkey , R.K. Bam and A.A. Ankomah
  The success of the introduction of any new Musa hybrid hinges on the acceptance of common dishes prepared from these hybrids by the local people. A study was conducted to assess the consumer acceptability of four FHIA hybrids (FHIA-21, FHIA-01, FHIA-03 and FHIA-25 for a popular food preparation called kaakle with local Apantu (local False Horn plantain) as control. Kaakle is prepared by blending the pulp of over-ripened pulp of plantain or banana fruits. The paste produced is mixed with 20% corn flour. Salt and spices are added to the composite paste produced to taste. The composite paste is then packaged and wrapped in green plantain leaves and boiled for 1 h. In some localities it is boiled for 1 h especially in the evening and left on fire overnight. It is eaten without sauce after peeling off the plantain leaves. An untrained panel reflecting the range of social class of consumers within the ethnic group was presented with coded samples of the food preparation. All the varieties were accepted for use in preparing kaakle with overall acceptance ranging from 70% (FHIA-25) to 100% (FHIA-21 and FHIA-01). The local Apantu and FHIA-21 were highly accepted compared to the other hybrids. In the processed form the tetraploid hybrids compare favourably with the triploids. There was a significant difference in the overall acceptance between cooking bananas (FHIA-25 and FHIA-03) and plantains (FHIA-21) and dessert banana (FHIA-01). This is not surprising since in the raw ripe state the cooking bananas have low sugar content. FHIA-25 in the raw ripe state lack the banana aroma associated with bananas. The results indicated that considering the food habit of the ethnic group, the new varieties that may be rejected in some localities may receive favourable responses from others. It is therefore relevant to allow various ethnic groups to evaluate new hybrids according to the food habits and if possible release these varieties as ecotypes.
 
 
 
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